5 Keys Decisions to Make Before Buying a Homestead Property

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drought effects5. Climate/Soil

Many people tend to start with this as a primary consideration. If you’re planning to run a thriving cattle ranch or vineyard, this is crucial. But acquiring a property that fits perfectly into a commercial enterprise will cost you extra, much extra.

On the other hand, from the desert to the pine forest, most regions have their own agricultural or geological advantages which you can learn to use.

Goats can survive on almost any soil. Does the property have rock quarry potential? Lots of timber? Is it possible that you could use the resources on your property to build something valuable to your neighbors?

You can tailor your homesteading enterprise to suit the strengths of your individual property. In fact, that’s what the smart landowner would do.

Just because the ranch a mile over has great soil for sauvignon grapes doesn’t mean that your property will. Likewise, water resources are crucial to any farming activity you may have on your mind.┬áProven ranches and farms demand a premium that most buyers simply can’t afford to pay.

This is exactly why we placed fifth on the list. It’s very important, and it relates directly to your goal (item #2). Still, learning to exploit the indigenous resources on a property is typically going to be easier and more cost effective than trying to purchase a turnkey farm or ranch.

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